Who will you pick for DC Council at-large on April 23?

Anita Bonds

Anita Bonds is the interim at-large DC Councilmember appointed in December by the DC Democratic State Committee, which she chaired since 2006. She helped run campaigns and worked on constituent services for Marion Barry when he was mayor, worked on presidential campaigns for Edward Kennedy and Jesse Jackson, and later served as an advisor for Sharon Pratt Kelly, Anthony Williams, and Kwame Brown. She lives in Truxton Circle.

Question 9

We asked the candidates:

DC is moving towards implementing a number of changes to its zoning code. To that end, where do you stand on eliminating parking minimums near transit; allowing residents to rent out basements, garages, etc. in low-density areas; and allowing more neighborhood-serving retail in residential neighborhoods?

Unfortunately, Anita Bonds did not respond to this question.

Question 8

We asked the candidates:

Last year DC Schools Chancellor Kaya Henderson said that DC schools are suffering from a "truancy crisis." The DC Council is now debating a bill that would increase penalties on parents for kids who chronically miss school. Should parents be held to account for when their kids miss school? How can DC ensure that students attend school consistently?

Unfortunately, Anita Bonds did not respond to this question.

Question 7

We asked the candidates:

Below are a set of proposals for ethics reform which some have advocated in recent years. For each, would you vote for or against? Further, you can explain any position in more detail if you wish and offer any additional ethics measures you would advocate for.

  • Ban or limit outside employment
  • Eliminate or constrain constituent service funds
  • Ban corporate contributions to campaigns
  • Ban "bundling" from multiple entities controlled by same person
  • Ban contributions by contractors and/or lobbyists who do business with DC
  • Forbid free or discounted legal services, travel gifts, sports tickets for councilmembers

Unfortunately, Anita Bonds did not respond to this question.

Question 6

We asked the candidates:

Residents who walk and bicycle often feel our streets are not sufficiently safe for them. Others feel that projects to accommodate bicycles and pedestrians have impeded quality of life for those who must drive. Is there a way forward that can bring peace among all road users? What would you say to each of these groups?

Anita Bonds responded:

With DC's recent recognition as one of the most bike-friendly cities in the country, peace amongst cyclist, pedestrians and drivers is of the utmost importance in this diverse and flourishing city. I have family and friends who ride bicycles, drive cars and are frequent pedestrians. I always remind them to use caution when engaging in either mode of traveling throughout the city. We've witnessed a huge increase in the number of people opting to ride bikes since the District opened the first automated bike-share system in the country. We've also experience a steady increase in traffic congestion; therefore it's become imperative that pedestrians, cyclers and drivers are mutually respectful of each other on the open roads. I've always encouraged each of these groups to observe and obey the laws that govern the road. However, I believe it's equally important for city officials to ensure that the public receives more education about traffic and bike laws coupled with an increase in visible signs that promote traffic and bike safety. This way we won't continue to have confusion as we've experienced with the L St. bike lane and the legalities around making U turns for drivers. Finally, I'd also express to each of these groups that we should accompany our adherence to traffic and bike laws with common-sense decency and respect. I'd continue to encourage city officials and cycling advocacy groups to work together towards developing solutions aimed at getting all road users on the same page. This way cyclist, pedestrians and drivers in this great city can begin to live the example set by citizens like those from Chicago to Copenhagen and other bike-friendly cities around the world that live harmoniously and peacefully enjoy the open roads without impeding on the quality of life for one another.

Here is how you rated the candidates' responses:

Question 5

We asked the candidates:

What do you think the District should do with its $417 million surplus?

Unfortunately, Anita Bonds did not respond to this question.

Question 4

We asked the candidates:

Mayor Gray has set a goal of growing by 250,000 residents in 20 years. Previous mayors had similar goals. GMU studies suggest we need over 122,000 new housing units (each of which might hold multiple people) by 2030. How can and should the District accommodate this growth?

Unfortunately, Anita Bonds did not respond to this question.

Question 3

We asked the candidates:

DC's education system has improved in recent years for many kids, but many schools remain inadequate to our children's needs. If you could design a better school system for DC, what would it look like? Would we have more teacher evaluations or fewer? More charter schools, fewer, or different ones? More or fewer kids going to local schools? How else would your school system differ from the one we have today?

Unfortunately, Anita Bonds did not respond to this question.

Question 2

We asked the candidates:

Chief Lanier and Mayor Gray have made a lot of the drop in homicides, but other crimes — assaults, robberies — remain stubbornly high. How should DC police deal with those challenges, and do you have an opinion on how many officers MPD needs?

Unfortunately, Anita Bonds did not respond to this question.

Question 1

We asked the candidates:

The District has changed a lot since 1993, and will likely change much more by 2033. What are 2-3 changes you hope to see by 2033, and how will electing you to the DC Council help bring them about?

Unfortunately, Anita Bonds did not respond to this question.

Whats next

We will be asking the candidates more questions, and will post their responses to one question each week on Tuesday. In addition, after voting ends, we will analyze the results and post a summary of your reactions.

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